Look Out Below
anarchy-in-the-ak:

lanatura:

Glaciers - Juneau Icefield Alaska (by edpuskas)

Mendenhall

anarchy-in-the-ak:

lanatura:

Glaciers - Juneau Icefield Alaska (by edpuskas)

Mendenhall

k2aviation:

Climbing season has come and gone already! Which means we’re already half way through the summer. Yeesh. 

archaeologicalnews:

image

After decades, possibly centuries, at the bottom of the sea — and a 2,200-mile-long (3,540 kilometers) road trip wrapped in damp blankets in the back of a pickup truck — a barnacle-crusted anchor arrived in Texas this week for a major cleaning.

The men who raised the object from the floor of…

thedemonshade:

I live in one of the most beautiful places on earth, Southeast Alaska and every two years when the city of Juneau, and the local Tlingit and Haida people hosts a multi-clan gathering of First Nation People called “Celebration” I am reminded that not only is the scenery stunning here, but we are also blessed with some of the most beautiful people on earth.

My good friend Susan took these photos and I, with my crappy camera, am forever grateful to her.

huntingtonlibrary:

As a young Los Angeles grew, people built more and more along, across, and in the floodplain of the Los Angeles River. And, as you can see in this photograph of the aftermath of a flood in 1885, this at times met with disastrous results. And so, long story short, the river was paved. Channelized. The Getty has a now-familiar view for you.
We’re teaming up with the Getty’s tumblr to bring you historic Los Angeles images on Wednesdays through August 6 as part of No Further West.
caption: Charles C. Pierce (1861-1946), Downey Ave. Bridge (now Broadway) in flood of 1885, 1885. Silver gelatin print, 8 x 10 in. Title from verso. Additional text reads, “The Santa Fe tracks washed out. Street car on extreme right.” The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

This was how I grew up. This was what I knew to be a “river” when I was a kid when everyone else would just know this view from scenes in movies like “Grease" or "Terminator 2”. Behind my backyard was literally the scene below: high tension wires and a cement river. Except that I grew up right next to the San Gabriel River, the next major river south/east of the LA River.

huntingtonlibrary:

As a young Los Angeles grew, people built more and more along, across, and in the floodplain of the Los Angeles River. And, as you can see in this photograph of the aftermath of a flood in 1885, this at times met with disastrous results. And so, long story short, the river was paved. Channelized. The Getty has a now-familiar view for you.

We’re teaming up with the Getty’s tumblr to bring you historic Los Angeles images on Wednesdays through August 6 as part of No Further West.

caption: Charles C. Pierce (1861-1946), Downey Ave. Bridge (now Broadway) in flood of 1885, 1885. Silver gelatin print, 8 x 10 in. Title from verso. Additional text reads, “The Santa Fe tracks washed out. Street car on extreme right.” The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

This was how I grew up. This was what I knew to be a “river” when I was a kid when everyone else would just know this view from scenes in movies like “Grease" or "Terminator 2”. Behind my backyard was literally the scene below: high tension wires and a cement river. Except that I grew up right next to the San Gabriel River, the next major river south/east of the LA River.

The LA River and its tributaries twist and turn through many neighborhoods in Los Angeles. This concrete creation was a result of not-so-uncommon flooding in the 19th century. The Huntington has proof.
We’re teaming up The Huntington’s tumblr to bring you historic Los Angeles images on Wednesdays through August 6 as part of No Further West.
The Los Angeles River from the Florence Avenue Bridge, 2001, John Humble. J. Paul Getty Museum. © John Humble, Courtesy of Jan Kesner Gallery.

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two

Episode 1 “Come Together”

Mycenaean art.

The Mycenaean civilization flourished in the late Bronze Age, from the 15th to the 13th century BCE.

The Mycenaeans were influenced by the earlier Minoan civilization (2000-1450 BCE) which had spread from its origins at Knossos, Crete to include the wider Aegean. Architecture, art and religious practices were assimilated and adapted to better express the perhaps more militaristic and austere Mycenaean culture.

Quite unlike the Minoans, whose society benefited from trade, the Mycenaeans advanced through conquest. Mycenaean civilization was dominated by a warrior aristocracy. Their kings lived in heavily-fortified fortresses, they hunted lions in the mountains and they went into battle in helmets made from boars’ tusks.

PART II

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired
i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired

i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

loveforallbears:

Brown bears hunt salmon in Russia’s Far East by photographer Michel Roggo - The Telegraph

marine-conservation:

Shrimp is the #1 seafood in the USA. It is tasty, usually quite inexpensive, and is easily cooked and eaten. Unfortunately, such a craze for shrimp has created an environmental nightmare.

image

Americans currently consume over one billion pounds of shrimp every year,…

Not to mention there is legitimate slave labor going into much of the shrimp industry. Yet another reason why it’s probably best to abstain from eating shrimp unless you’re harvesting your own.

chico-tequila:

Gracias Coca Cola por mi nacimiento xD

chico-tequila:

Gracias Coca Cola por mi nacimiento xD