Look Out Below

"Guelaguetza es una palabra zapoteca que tiene un alto sentido de participación y cooperación, es un don que no es obligatorio, sólo el deseo de cooperar con otros.

Las ocho regiones que se reunen en la Guelaguetza son: Cañada, Costa, Istmo, Mixteca, Región Cuenca del Papaloapan, Sierra Sur, Sierra Norte y los Valles Centrales.

La Guelaguetza es simplemente la festividad más importante en Oaxaca. Es la reunión de las ocho regiones del estado en el cerro del Fortín dos lunes de julio en la fiesta dancística más colorida de todo el país.”

Source

mapsontheweb:

Reduction in the size of the Aral Sea from 1960 to 2008

mapsontheweb:

Reduction in the size of the Aral Sea from 1960 to 2008

archaeologicalnews:

image

A group of researchers from İzmir’s Dokuz Eylül University’s Institute of Marine Science and Technology (IMST), who conduct research on sunken ships located between Muğla’s Datça peninsula and Antalya, have discovered eight new sunken ships.

The latest research project by the IMST, which receives funding from the Culture and Tourism Ministry, Development Ministry and Bodrum Municipality, has taken three months to complete.

The institute’s deputy director Associate professor Harun Özdaş said the first stage of the Aegean and Mediterranean research had been finished in 2004, adding: “The main purpose of the project is to expand the inventory of sunken ships. Read more.

malformalady:

Frozen beneath the ice

malformalady:

Frozen beneath the ice

oqos:

We Germans love our compound words… and sometimes things get out of hand. 
Sure, there is one which is basically a game: “How many words can you stick together but still let it make sense?” 
Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänswitwe literally means “widow of a captain of a Danube shipping company”.
The game: Add more words. 
Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänsmützenanstecknadelfabrikant. That still makes sense in German. It’s the “producer of cap pins for captain’s of Danube shipping companies”.
But this is a game (and yep, there are three “f” in Schifffahrt. That’s no mistake.)


The longest, certified, words in the German language has been made superfluous in 2007:
Grundstücksverkehrsgenehmigungszuständigkeitsübertragungsverordnung proudly counts 67 letters. 
It never made it into the Duden (the German counterpart for the Oxford dictionary). The longest word in there seems humble in comparison: Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung (37 letters) is the casualty insurance for your motored vehicle.

The next title holder was disbanded in 2013, because Mecklenburg-West Pomerania (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) changed it’s laws.
The word in question (counting 63 letters):
Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz

Let’s break that monster down:
Rindfleisch - beef (literally “meat of cattle/cow)
Etikettierung -  labeling
Überwachung - control/inspection
Aufgabenübertragung - duty transfer
Gesetz - law

You already have two compound words (“Rindfleisch” and “Aufgabenübertragung)” in here and they are put together with others to create a name for a law, that describes the duty transfer of the inspection of labeling of beef.
Yeah. Take breath after that one.
It’s shortened to RkReÜAÜG. Don’t ask my  how they get to THAT. 

But hey - sometimes English can have long words, too.
pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (45 letters) in German simply means “Quarzstaublunge”.

It’s a crazy, but loveable, quirk of the German language - great for confusing everyone (first language speakers included).

lastrealindians:

Tribal canoe journey to Bella Bella BC 2014

lastrealindians:

Tribal canoe journey to Bella Bella BC 2014

oosik:

Loretta the Lynx

Loretta was found on a mine survey by a friend. Because of this, she was named after Loretta Lynn, the coal miner’s daughter. Found at the beginning of the survey Loretta was buried for a week before being bagged up and brought back to me in Anchorage. 

At first look (1), Loretta was only half a lynx. Her back half was missing as well as one of her front paws, possibly from a trapping incident. Luckily the skull was intact, so I focused on that. To in no way harm the skull, I separated the spine at roughly the 4th vertebra. The entire column was coated in dead, desiccated maggots (2,3). 

I let Loretta soak for a bit to make the skin and soft tissues pliable (4). I peeled back the face skin keeping it intact (5). Once removed, the tongue and eyes were still present (6). I removed those along with the extraneous vertebrae which left blood-soaked teeth and some remnant soft tissue (7).

To remove this I put the skull, mandible, and cervical vertebrae into a water bath to macerate. The little skull to the left is an arctic hare that I had just completed (8). After a few weeks I pulled her out to see her progress. She still had some soft tissue so she went back into fresh water again (9).

Felids generally don’t have complete orbits. With the photo taken today, she shows that she still has some soft tissue completing the orbit (10). I like it. The entire process took maybe a month or two at the most. Leaving things to sit in water for a while really works well.