Look Out Below
mapsontheweb:

States that never elected female to Congress
Read More

But here’s the thing for Alaska: Due to our population, we only have one seat for the House, and right now it’s being held by Don Young who was held that position since 1973. Prior to that, there have only been THREE OTHER PEOPLE in that seat since Alaska has been a state (1959). And to further tease out the web that is the small population of Alaska, the predecessor of Don Young who died in a plane crash, Nick Begich, his son is currently the male representative within the Senate, Mark Begich.

mapsontheweb:

States that never elected female to Congress

Read More

But here’s the thing for Alaska: Due to our population, we only have one seat for the House, and right now it’s being held by Don Young who was held that position since 1973. Prior to that, there have only been THREE OTHER PEOPLE in that seat since Alaska has been a state (1959). And to further tease out the web that is the small population of Alaska, the predecessor of Don Young who died in a plane crash, Nick Begich, his son is currently the male representative within the Senate, Mark Begich.

memoirsofanatom:

Three ulus
Iglulingmiut, AD 1980s From Igloolik, Nunavut, eastern Canadian Arctic
Inuit women use a crescent-shaped knife, the ulu, in most aspects of food and skin preparation: for skinning animals, preparing skins, butchering, eating, and sewing. Different kinds of ulus are used for different purposes:
'The smaller ulu are only for cutting patterns, - they are too small to use for skin preparation. To prepare skins, I usually use the ones that get sharp easily, or the ones that are sharp, that is the way I know it. The largest ulu is the one that removes the blubber from a skin ….' Rachel Uyarasuk, 1994
Today, ulu blades are usually made of sheets of stainless steel or saw blades. In the past, slate was the material most commonly used.
'There is a stone called uluksarnnak, this was used for ulus. The blade was grounded to thinness; as you file away the stone, you would look up the blade to see if the light is coming through, and when that happens, it is thin enough … It was said that someone was given a knife, most likely when people were just being introduced to imported goods. This man was given a knife, and he proceeded to sharpen it. He would hold it up to see if the light would go through it, but the light would not go through. So he said: 'Ipiksijunnanngittualuk una' ('This cannot get sharp'). At once he ran the blade through his hand, it went right through.' Rachel Uyarasuk, 1994

memoirsofanatom:

Three ulus

Iglulingmiut, AD 1980s
From Igloolik, Nunavut, eastern Canadian Arctic

Inuit women use a crescent-shaped knife, the ulu, in most aspects of food and skin preparation: for skinning animals, preparing skins, butchering, eating, and sewing. Different kinds of ulus are used for different purposes:

'The smaller ulu are only for cutting patterns, - they are too small to use for skin preparation. To prepare skins, I usually use the ones that get sharp easily, or the ones that are sharp, that is the way I know it. The largest ulu is the one that removes the blubber from a skin ….'
Rachel Uyarasuk, 1994

Today, ulu blades are usually made of sheets of stainless steel or saw blades. In the past, slate was the material most commonly used.

'There is a stone called uluksarnnak, this was used for ulus. The blade was grounded to thinness; as you file away the stone, you would look up the blade to see if the light is coming through, and when that happens, it is thin enough … It was said that someone was given a knife, most likely when people were just being introduced to imported goods. This man was given a knife, and he proceeded to sharpen it. He would hold it up to see if the light would go through it, but the light would not go through. So he said: 'Ipiksijunnanngittualuk una' ('This cannot get sharp'). At once he ran the blade through his hand, it went right through.'
Rachel Uyarasuk, 1994

image

I’m all for burning things, but one would think that there’s a lot better things to do with a giant hot dog than to go straight to the BBQ.

havamal93:

The red territories above indicate the distribution of Native American Tribes with Algonquin Languages.

Here follows a selection of The Algonquin Legends of New England, by Charles G. Leland, [1884]. The purposes of posting these myths, using these interpretations, and mythic variations, is to assert that the various Algonquin Speaking tribes were in fact descendants of the Norse colony of Vinland, and heirs of norse heathenism in the new world. I felt compelled to share this new-world mythology to combat the folkish belief that only caucasians, or even scandinavians, have any claim to norse religion.

Though this antiquated text on Native American Religious Legends holds it’s own biases, I have further selected only those portions which emphasize the points which are most indicative of norse Influence. However the original page can be read here, http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/ne/al/al07.htm

.

"How Glooskap made the Elves and Fairies, and then Man of an Ash Tree, and last of all, Beasts, and of his Coming at the Last Day.

(Passamaquoddy.)

Glooskap came first of all into this country, into Nova Scotia, Maine, Canada, into the land of the Wabanaki, next to sunrise. There were no Indians here then (only wild Indians very far to the west).

First born were the Mikumwess, the Oonahgemessuk, the small Elves, little men, dwellers in rocks.

And in this way he made Man: He took his bow and arrows and shot at trees, the basket-trees, the Ash. Then Indians came out of the bark of the Ash-trees. …..

…So he questioned all the beasts, changing their size or allotting their lives according to their answers.

He took the Loon (a bird) for his dog; but the Loon absented himself so much that he chose for this service two wolves,—one black and one white. 4 But the Loons are always his tale-bearers.

Many years ago a man very far to the North wished to cross a bay, a great distance, from one point to another. As he was stepping into his canoe he saw a man with two dogs,—one black and one white,—who asked to be set across. The Indian said, “You may go, but what will become of your dogs?” Then the stranger replied, “Let them go round by land.” “Nay,” replied the Indian, “that is much too far.” But the stranger saying nothing, he put him across. And as they reached the landing place there stood the dogs. But when he turned his head to address the man, he was gone. So he said to himself, “I have seen Glooskap.”

Yet again,—but this was not so many years ago, far in the North there were at a certain place many Indians assembled. And there was a frightful commotion, caused by the ground heaving and rumbling; the rocks shook and fell, they were greatly alarmed, and lo! Glooskap stood before them, and said, “I go away now, but I shall return again; when you feel the ground tremble, then know it is I.” So they will know when the last great war is to be, for then Glooskap will make the ground shake with an awful noise. ….

..This very interesting tradition was taken down by Mrs. W. Wallace Brown from a very old Passamaquoddy Indian woman named Molly Sepsis, who could not speak a word of English, with the aid of another younger woman named Sarah.

It will be observed that it is said in the beginning that Glooskap produced the first human beings from the ash-tree. Ash and Elm in the Edda were the Adam and Eve of the human race. There were no intelligent men on earth—

"Until there came three
mighty and benevolent
Aesir to the world
from their assembly
nearly powerless,
Ash and Embla (Ash and Elm),
void of destiny.

"Spirit they possessed not,
sense they had not,
blood nor motive powers,
nor goodly color.
Spirit gave Odin,
sense gave Hoenir,
blood gave Lodur
and good color. ” 1

…….

The wolf, as a beast for the deity to ride, is strongly Eddaic.

"Magic songs they sung,
rode on Wolves,
the god (Odin) and gods. 1

We have here within a few lines, accordingly, the ash as the parent of mankind, and wolves as the beasts of transport for the supreme deity, both in the Indian legend and in the Edda.

As Glooskap is directly declared in one tradition to keep by him as an attendant a being who is the course of the sun and of the seasons, it may be assumed that the black and white wolf represent day and night.

Again, great stress is laid in the Glooskap legend upon the fact that the last great day of battle with Malsum. the Wolf, and the frost-giants, stone-giants, and other powers of evil, shall be announced by an earthquake.

"Trembles Yggdrasil’s
Ash yet standing,
groans that aged tree …
and the Wolf runs …
The monster’s kin goes
all with the Wolf… .
Tile stony hills are dashed together,
The giantesses totter.
Then arises Hlin’s second grief
When Odin goes
with the wolf to fight.”

Word for word, ash-tree, giantesses, the supreme god fighting with a wolf, and falling hills, are given in the Indian myth. This is not the Christian Day of Judgment, but the Norse.

In this myth Glooskap has two wolves, one black and the other white. This is an indication of day and night, since he is distinctly stated to have as an attendant Kulpejotei, who typifies the course of the seasons. In the Eddas (Ragnarok) we are told that one wolf now follows the, sun, another the moon; one Fenris, the other Moongarm:—

"The moon’s devourer
In a troll’s disguise.”

rangenbalance:

Secret River, Mexico

rangenbalance:

Secret River, Mexico

bonedahlia:

bigbootsandscaryeyes:

Ash just told me that i should do a “vulture ice bucket challenge” and tip maceration water over myself.
Fuck.
Off.

Only for enough money that I would never have to work again for a single day in my life! Even then I would hesitate. I’ve only emptied maceration water once and it is something I never want to experience again.

Yeah, no. Sometimes I don’t wear gloves when I empty maceration buckets and the contents get on my hands. The smell lingers for a few days if not a week.

queenofthecroutons:

sliana:

jocknoir:

stormcloaca:

lokiarrty:

suckmypoppunk:

unshaped:

wasn’t expecting this

but arent you glad it hapened

its ears ITS EARS ITS EARS ITS EARS

floomph

oh my god

I don’t know how I could live another day without seeing this

Kitty meow!!!!!

Last winter my cat kept meowing to get outside. So I took her outside and did this to her. She didn’t want outside after that until summer.

queenofthecroutons:

sliana:

jocknoir:

stormcloaca:

lokiarrty:

suckmypoppunk:

unshaped:

wasn’t expecting this

but arent you glad it hapened

its ears ITS EARS ITS EARS ITS EARS

floomph

oh my god

I don’t know how I could live another day without seeing this

Kitty meow!!!!!

Last winter my cat kept meowing to get outside. So I took her outside and did this to her. She didn’t want outside after that until summer.

rhamphotheca:

Jurassic Jaws: How Ancient Crocodyliforms Flourished During the Time of the Dinosaurs

While most modern crocodiles live in and feed on mammals and fish, their ancient relatives were extremely diverse – with some built for running around like dogs on land and others adapting to life in the , imitating the feeding behaviour of today’s .

Research published today [11 Sept.] in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B shows, for the first time, how the jaws of ancient crocodiles evolved to enable these animals to survive in vastly different environments, all whilst living alongside the dinosaurs 235 to .

The study was conducted by Tom Stubbs and Dr Emily Rayfield from the University of Bristol, together with Dr Stephanie Pierce from The Royal Veterinary College and Dr Phil Anderson from Duke University.

Tom Stubbs, who led the research at the University of Bristol, said: “The ancestors of today’s crocodiles have a fascinating history that is relatively unknown compared to their dinosaur counterparts. They were very different creatures to the ones we are familiar with today, much more diverse and, as this research shows, their ability to adapt was quite remarkable.

"Their evolution and anatomical variation during the Mesozoic Era was exceptional. They evolved lifestyles and feeding ecologies unlike anything seen today."…

(read more at: PhysOrg)

terresauvage:

Unknown Inuit artist
Three Model Kayakers, n.d.
~
The expression on the middle kayaker slays me.

terresauvage:

Unknown Inuit artist

Three Model Kayakers, n.d.

~

The expression on the middle kayaker slays me.

Alaska State Fair
Judge Scott Robb brushes off dirt from beneath Dale Marshall’s 1283.5 lb first place entry during the Pumpkin Weigh-off yesterday at the Alaska State Fair. And, while it was 3 lbs short of the Alaska record, it was still one giant gourd!
(Photo: Clark James Mishler)

Alaska State Fair

Judge Scott Robb brushes off dirt from beneath Dale Marshall’s 1283.5 lb first place entry during the Pumpkin Weigh-off yesterday at the Alaska State Fair. And, while it was 3 lbs short of the Alaska record, it was still one giant gourd!

(Photo: Clark James Mishler)